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's education. people say that federal loans have card caps of $5,000-$7,000 per year. you can only borrow a total of $33,000 for undergrad. but that is not looking at the parent portion of the picture. the parent portion allows you to borrow as much as you need, to fill the unmet need, to pay your child's way to get to a particular school. there is a credit check that is very modest and there is not a check on income. but as costs have grown, perhaps the limits we have had on federal student loans do not meet the needs the students and families are experiencing when they are trying to pay for college. you see the growth in the program where more parents are borrowing from this program. recipients have doubled in the past decade, and they are borrowing more money as well. we thought it was emblematic of the shift in the system. >> would you say the apparent lack of paycheck is one of the most consistent missing pieces? if someone has an income of $10,000 a year, they can take out a loan for $30,000. >> if they do not have a negative credit history, and we could have a larger conversation a
charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and wit
education and remembering general norman schwarzkopf. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. toda
morning. thank you for educating people on your television show. we live in a community where we are experiencing exactly what you're talking about, particularly businesses, and i am talking big businesses. they do not like where the doors are located, or this department over here, and what they are doing is restricting jobs and tax base. i would encourage people to get involved in your institute and fight this because it is not doing anything for the economy or our country. merry christmas to everybody. host: john, thank you for the call. what is the history of the cato institute, founded in 1977? guest: it was founded to promote liberty and economic freedom, starting in san francisco, and then move into washington, d.c. milton friedman admitted the kindle institute has never sold out. we still work for liberty and freedom. i've been working with the cato institute since 1995 and full time since 2007. host: mary, fort washington, maryland. democrat. caller: i would suggest thinking that if you follow all of the problems come at the end of the trail you will find the smiling grin
powell. [applause] we are thrilled to have our local and national education and safety leaders here to discuss the promise neighborhood program and how we promote safety in our schools. i have been a principal and excited and delighted principal in this community for 80 years. i know how hard families work a day in and day out to achieve academically support each other and the community and to make sure our children have six classrooms, said playgrounds -- safe classrooms, safe playgrounds, and save homes to welcome them. this school has been a proud a partner of the thomas neighborhood initiative. i realize some of our struggling students addressing these challenges in the class term alone was not going to be enough to help get them on the path to success and achieve what we know they are capable of in the future. we need to work with a broader coalition of partners to address their needs outside of the classroom, in the home, on the streets in the community. i am so thankful to our founder. [applause] for starting this hard work, they have continued the hard work over the past yea
was six-years old. he was a special education uden hisaren issd a statement. we take great solace that dylan died in the loving arms of his favorite teacher, the special education teacher, anne marie murphy. the teachers in that school, the principal, psychologist, the teachers that die protecting their children, saving their children, comforting their children, those who survived, they are true heroes and they have not received the recognition, in my judgment, that they deserve. i point out that every one of them is a public-school teacher, a group that has been condemned, vilified, and denigrated by all sorts of people. >> do wonderbout ts nes we are making about mental illness and violence. we have had a number of gun violence in the district of columbia where people have been killed by firearms, prince george's county as well. are you suggesting to me that everyone who pulled a trigger is mentally ill? is that the suggestion? >> no. >> in mass killings, if you look at the virginia tech guide, and jared loughner, he was diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic, which you could see
shockckley was 6 years old. he was a spepecial-education uden his p parents issued a statement. we take great solace that dylan died in the loving arms of his favorite teacher, a special- education teacher, , an marie murphy. 52, mother of four. the teachers of that school, the principa psychologist, the teacher that by protecting their children, saving their children, comforting theirir children, those th survived, they arerue heroes. theyave not received the recognition that they deserve. i would point out, everyone of ththem is a public schoolteacher. a group that has been c condemned vilified, and denigrated by all sorts of people. >> i do wonder about this nexus we are making between n mental illness and violence. we have had a number of gun -- violence where people were killed with fire arms, in prince george's county, too. are you suggesting that everyone who pulls a trigger is mentally ill? is that the suggestion? >> no. >> in mass killings, you look at jerry loughner, virginia tech loughner was diagngnosed as a paranoid schizophric, which you could see on day one. i am not sure abou
to grow up. i feel like if you do these little things, in the education system from sixth grade through 12th grade every year -- everyone knows who george washington is, but you should have a class every year that allows you to live in a better neighborhood and allows you to buy a home, and giving people a credit, and allows them to get a car with a low-interest rate. guest: a real problem in american education is we are no longer in a position to require high personal standards. good example, when i was in college, i got a piece of paper when i was a freshman, i went to a state teachers college in new york state, wonderful institution. they said we expect our students and i read with to endure to my personal standards or we will throw you out of here. that's basically what the paper said. that then filters down. we don't have that anymore. instead we hear about people come from different backgrounds and different cultures. i came from different backgrounds and a difficult to prevent him from an italian immigrant family in new york city. my father was aborted or salesman. his father was a
and well. the things he has done, whether it is health reform or education reform, making higher education more affordable, expanding pell grants, creating the consumer financial protection bureau. they are all aimed at one thing -- to create a economy in which we have a vital middle-class and our tax policy reflects that as well. opportunity is broadly available. i think that is solidly in the mainstream of the democratic party. we can have a debate about means of achieving that, and i think we have to do some soul- searching about how in the 21st century we achieve those goals, and whether all the avenues and pathways that made sense 50 and 60 and 70 years ago are still valid today. many of them may be -- some may not. on the fundamental goals, he is solidly in the position of the democratic party, solidly progressive. i think that is a lot of what the election was about. >> in this election it has been observed that much of the advertising was predominantly negative. i would like to ask -- i know both sides of campaigns engaged in this. including an obama at that scene to insinuate that
education and research and development, investing in clean energy and technology, investing in infrastructure and dealing with the deficits were more -- in a more balanced way. it was about what our obligations are to each other. it was about big things. those are very, very big things. i will say that, for all of the critique about whether our campaign was about big things or not, the preoccupations of people who write about that -- and i used to do that for a living -- i don't try to separate myself -- many of them are my best friends -- there is an awful lot of horse race coverage of this presidential race. there is such a preoccupation with who will win and who will lose and so little real interest in what the implications are. >> we were talking about pulling. >> public polling is so voluminous now. any to kids with an abacus can do a poll of the corner grocery store and some national news are in position will cover it as if it is news. and maybe the billion tommy pulled him out today. -- the billy and tommy poll came out today. it can be done sound yet they produce res
involved in another political campaign. but it talks about health care, education, the policy of capital punishment, which regardless of your philosophy isn't working. getting into responsible criminal-justice issues and rehabilitation, that sort of thing. i even recommended going on the metric system which is certainly something else and you said i'm running for vice president with governor gary johnson. it's amazing because she from a totally different perspective has come out to pretty much the same analysis that i have on all these important issues like education. today the talk you were wearing, and i like it by the way, deutsch shows how much to spend, where to go, what to buy. like all other consumer goods that is how we get reasonable bids for reasonable prices that education is completely different than that. it is funded from the top up so the federal government thinks of this money keeps a bunch of it and gives it to the state and keep a bunch of it for their administrative costs and give it to the school districts, give it to the schools, the use a lot of administrative costs
by this incredible will that he had and nursed for education. -- thirst for education. he was embarrassed to did not finish college, so he finished law school instead. he went on and on. the idea of senator byrd as majority leader of the senate is quite remarkable. he came into the senate with the great class of 1958. they set the foundation for what i call the great senate that came later, the progressive senate. it was a democratic landslide that your. -- year. he was undeniably the most conservative of senators elected. whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 19641965. he opposed martial -- in 1964 and 1965. he oppose richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time. he got lucky. issues that result on civil rights -- you got resolved on civil rights. senator byrd that's on the le
control. why all of this for one african-american student who wanted to get an education at a brand name university it's because the whole state was in an insurrection from the governors, from the statehouse itself down to the 11-year-old who were throwing bricks at us in the street. it was total chaos, total mayhem. even the mississippi highway patrol had pulled away, so there was your insurrection. lasted two or three days. the violent part of it. and then after that i was appointed to be the security officer for james meredith and went to school with him, or he went to school, i stayed outside with a hand-picked patrol, three jeeps, 12 soldiers, and we were there throughout the year. we transferred back and forth. the army was in place for almost a year until he graduated in august, 1963. i was 23 years old. i grew up in an all-white neighborhood in south min yapless, john -- minneapolis. a few italians, but that was pretty much it. so it was an eye opening for me. but, again, we were trained, and i am is so proud of what the army did. when you write a book -- this is my first -- the
mother and father through months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond hill georgia and the surroundisurroundi ng areas welcomes matthew home with tears, flags and staff salute. the streets were lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing it has memorial service at the methodist church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout, a local boy scout troop honored him by collecting pens and papers and sending them to mattheus unit map these unit in afghanistan. a dear friend who was involved in the media had a fission and the project began. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film on memorial day 2010. since then with the help of so many volunteers, and i can't name them all, that project has sent over seven tons of school supplies to our soldiers and marines in humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthews small town of richmond hill and outlying city of savannah and their great army bases of ft. stewart and hunter army airfield and the savannah aircard have helped me heal by supporting the
as did finding myself in this arena in having this incredible awakening and education. since i left the duke ellington school, i have often gone back to give master classes and work with young singers. my agency would often scheduled concert with master classes. again known in the industry has teaching younger -- i get known in the industry as teaching younger students. we have a number of to the -- we have a number of tickets we give away or offer at a discounted price. i remember when i was a student and saw my first opera. it was because the kennedy center and extended a certain amount of tickets for students to come. i realized there is a tremendous responsibility. it is also a pleasure to want to share this gorgeous art form with people and young people in particular. i know the impact and difference it made in my life have been known at 13 this is what i wanted to do. it gave me a direction and purpose. i never suffered under pressure of my desire to keep up with the latest. when i would go to a voice lesson or concert, there was no synthetic that could provide me with that ki
advocates and his godfather was the cardinal james gibbons of baltimore. he was educated at yale university and law school and immediately entered the navy where he received the purple heart for his service in the pacific theater. the immediacy of his experience has made him a man that was dedicated to making every feasible effort to achieve peace. after he was discharged at the end of the war key worked at newsweek magazine, and in that job came into contact with joseph kennedy sr., who asked him to manage the merchandise in chicago. during the chicago years, he married the daughter eunice in 1953 and chaired the chicago school board in the catholic interracial council as a supporter of desegregation of the city schools. shriver's prominence in the commercial and social life of the state soon lead to interest on the part of the political leaders to nominate him for governor of illinois. but by then, his brother-in-law, john kennedy, was running for president. shriver served us kennedy's chair for illinois and also head of the campaign civil rights division. in that capacity, leading a camp
with secretary of education arne duncan. >> schools have been forever the safe haven, often safest places in the community. and we need to continue to do everything in our power to make sure that they are. >> woodruff: kwame holman updates washington's spending and tax stalemate after house republicans decide not to follow the leader. >> brown: and mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the remaking of the obama administration's foreign policy team began today as the president nominat
? that's ahead. >>> plus, forget about a college education. why the oil fields of america are now attracting the young. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. now this...will work. [ male announcer ] just like you, business pro. just like you. go national. go like a pro. >>> gold prices closing right now. let's get to bertha coombs. >> gold closing fractionally higher, on track for its twelfth yearly gain, smallest since 2008 because it's been a very tough quarter for gold. despite the fact we've had all these worries, whether it be the fiscal cliff, the election, the situation in europe. nonetheless, gold has just not been the safe haven. this morning, it was industrial metals that got a boost as we saw rallies in asia on hopes that maybe this new regime in china is going to be spending more
him to take on this mission, he had already had sort of a graduate level education if you will in howards are fought in the desert and that separated him in many ways from his four star contemporaries who were mainly back in those days focused on fighting the war in europe. >> harris: for people just joining us, general norman schwarzkopf has died. he led operation desert shield and desert storm which were the largest deployments of u.s. forces and equipment since the vietnam war and general scales you just mentioned president george h.w. bush is ailing in the hospital but we have just gotten a statement from the former president and i want to share it with our viewers if you are still with us. the former president says "barbara and i mourn the loss of a true american patriot and one of the great mill tare leaders of our generation. hailing from westpoint. general norman schwarzkopf to me epitomized the service the dallesty creed that served our great nation through this trying natural crises. a good and decent man and a good friend. barbara and i send our condolences to h
education, that person should be considered literate and should able to register to vote. those of us in the student nonviolent coordinating committee took the position that the only qualification for being able to register to vote in america should be that of age and residency, nothing more or anything less. we wanted a much stronger bill. but the whole idea of the march was not to support a particular piece of legislation. it was a march for jobs and freedom. it was a coalition of conscience to say to the congress and say to the president of the united states, "you must act." we didn't think that the proposed bill was commensurate to all of the suffering, to the beatings, to the jailing, to the killing that had occurred in the south. amy goodman: congressman john lewis. he's just written a new book called across that bridge: life lessons and a vision for change. i'll continue the interview with him in a moment. [break] amy goodman: "ain't gonna let nobody turn me round," the sncc freedom singers, a group that traveled the country singing and fundraising for the student nonviolent co
effort. is the education, this plan -- the discipline. congolese military is riddled with problems, but just the simple training and discipline and has made a difference. we have ongoing efforts on the rule of law and military justice. we spend millions of dollars to work with the military during a wholesale way on mentor ship and to make sure that human rock -- human rights and the law are instilled drought. -- instill that throughout. >> and where you have seen efforts not working at all, where is it? is it the same? >> again, the challenges are paramount. these are forces that do not howff a great amount of discipline. they do not have great training. enda in many cases, they do not have great education. there is a capacity problem within the drc, and it makes it harder to try to train them up in a way that meets the standards that we would like to see in the military. >> would you like to comment further? gregg's yes, i would. -- >> yes, i would. i would like to say that security sector reform in the army has been a failure, for the most part. it is a failure because of all of
without some investment in infrastructure or education and the like, our recovery may falter and then given what is going on in europe and much of the world, that would be bad news. i think the number one job is to keep us on good, sound, fiscal standing and he has to deal with some of these outstanding issues. then you move on and you start to see things like education and how we deal with education in this country and the need for reform continues to be out there. working with the education secretary, it is going to occupy a bitter moment for this president. americans believe in education and of the it is the first step on that ladder to upward mobility. that is going to be a challenge that this president has to deal with them than he has to find these issues and then define them in terms of common ground. host: juan williams joining us on this christmas day. joining us from texas, this is ken. go ahead. caller: good morning. merry christmas. i live in texas. the people in east texas -- i don't mean to say it, but white people really do not like this president. you can list
that picture. and it's part of the education of john f. kennedy. one thing i like about president kennedy, he was raw, he was green, but he did learn on the job. he was bullied by kruschev in 1961, he had a rough summer in berlin, but he learned. and by the time to have cuban missile crisis in 1962, he's a great president. you listen to the tapes, and i have for a book i wrote about bobby kennedy, half of the sessions are taped, president kennedy's great. particularly on the last day, the 13th day when everybody's starting to get a little nervous, you can hear the voices get a little squeaky, president kennedy is cool. and he understands we have to make a deal with the russians. we have to do it secretly, but we have to make a deal with them. and thank god he had a couple of years to learn on the job, because he did in the end handle the crisis well. and some of his education came from president eisenhower. anybody else? thank you very much. [applause] >> visit the author's web site, evanthomasbooks.com. >> with a month left in 2012, many publications are putting together their year-end lists
or nothing guy, and kennedy gets the picture. it's part of the education with kennedy. what i like about kennedy is he was raw and green, but he learned on the ground. he was bullied at the vienna summit, a rough summer with berlin, but he learned, and by the time of the cuban missile crisis in 1962, he's a great president. listen to the tapes of the missile crisis, and i have for a book i wrote on bobby kennedy, after the tapes, kennedy sounds great. president kennedy, particularly on the last day, the 13th day everybody's getting nervous, you hear voices getting squeaky, president kennedy is cool understanding we need a deal, russians, secretly, but have to make a deal with them, and thank god there was a couple years to learn on the job, and because he did in the end handle the crisis well. some of the education came from president eisenhower. anybody else? thank you very much. [applause] >>> for more information visit the author's website at evanthomasbooks.com. >> booktv on location at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, maryland interviews professors who a also authors. we are joi
part-time or summer hire. we never did get into the education thing at all. we are focused on doing a job. my point on education is that there is something revolutionary that needs to happen. if you look now in the internet age and realize the rate at which a student downloads information -- the people who are really smart are bored. i think within maybe 20-25 years, you won't see a classroom typically like we do, where you see everybody goes to a classroom. it is for that reason, it is not a good thing to teach people who are going to be innovators later on. next question. >> thank you very much for your talk. what skills, academic, etc., do you need at early ages to facilitate creativity and innovation? how can parents and schools shape these attributes for kids? >> in answering that, i am going to focus on word that you said. you said cultivate. the point i have tried to make is that if things are going around in the world outside of the kid's community, outside of his local interface and outside of his school, if he sees wonderful progress happen, that is so different -- that is
washington. there is so much to be done on jobs, income, education, and energy. we are a week away from one of the worst tragedies in memory. so we have got work to do on gun safety. a host of other issues. these are all challenges we can meet. these are all colleges we have to meet, if we want our kids to grow up in america that is full of opportunity and possibility, as much opportunity and possibility that our parents and our grandparents left for us. but we are only going to be able to do it together. we are going to have to find some common ground. the challenge we have got right now is that the american people are a lot more sensible and a lot more thoughtful, and much more willing to compromise and give and sacrifice and act responsibly, than their elected representatives are. that is a problem. there is a mismatch between how everybody else is thinking about these problems, democrats and republicans up side of this town, and how folks are acting here. we have to get the aligned. and we only have 10 days to do that. i hope every member of congress is thinking about that. nobody can g
. gregg: what do you think? >> i think i want to go after the whole legal educational complex. as a legal employer myself i can tell you that my heart goes out to anyone graduating law school right now. mr. sullivan wants to say that they are providing you a legal education, a socratic-type experience, that's fine. put that on the brochure. have it in big letters when you get the nice gloss see brochure and say look, we are not here providing you with the skills you need to actually pay back this $250,000 in debt we'll saddle you werement we are providing you with an educational experience and let the cards fall where they may. it's absolutely an ethical problem. to realize how wrong this is look at what goes on in medical schools. you don't see thousands of medical students graduating medical school with no prospect of employment. if the medical schools can calibrate the number of admission slots to the need for doctors why can't the a ba do the exact same thing. gregg: i did teach a law school class and what they represented to their students, and truth there is no resemblance. >> the d
teachers being armed? >> i think our teachers have a challenging enough job just being educators and being teachers in our community and i think the issue of gun violence is a challenging one and i think there are many solutions to the problem. we just need to be able to bring folks together in a way that we can have sensible conversations about these issues and figure out the best course of action moving forward. teachers are in the classroom to teach. >> bill and sierra toomey -- >> we need to support them in that. >> thank you both and thank you for sharing your thoughts, and we are certainly thinking about you there in newtown. thank you very much. >> thank you. thank you very much, randi. >> and we want to let you know that we did reach out to 43 senators of the incoming 113th congress who have an "a" or "a" plus rating from the nra, and not one of them agreed to join us for this conversation this morning. >>> coming up next hour, we'll continue this discussion with attorney paul callan. he'll explain what the second amendment really allows and the original intention. >>> senator john
an educator in each school to carry a gun. >> if you have somebody come in that is mentally ill with a weapon and they're killing people, an administrator or teacher can figure that out. >> the move comes after the recent shooting massacre in newtown, connecticut. a gunman shot and killed 26 people at sandy hook elementary school. 20 of the victims were young children. gun rights advocates saying teachers can act more quickly than law enforcement in the critical first few minutes to protect children during the school shooting. but some teachers strongly disagree with the idea. >> i think it is ridiculous. i don't think that teachers should be carrying guns. i don't think violence is the answer and the biggest thing i don't think is i don't think it will solve the problem. >> reporter: only a handful of states including utah and new hampshire allow concealed weapons in public schools. >>> we still have plenty ahead. your weather, traffic and all of your stop stories. >> fox 5 morning news at 4:30 starts now. >> good morning. things are looking pretty well out there as traffic is moving along p
education and basic training programs we can help -- lift the congolese army up and get them closer to the standards we want to see in the military, i want to stress that is still a relatively modest investment of our money and time. we find we're able to get a fairly large return on that investment in terms of the output. it is no secret that if we were to seek further defense cuts -- see further defense cuts, we would have to take a close look at all of these. even as modest as the expenditures countrurrently are. >> give that some thought, and if you could get back to us with the record on that, and pull together the best you can the dollars that we're spending. are they adequate? give us some idea of apartheid station. we of got to look at all of that in the grand -- the total spending. >> i would like to ask the panel what you feel like with regard to m23, their ultimate aims. do you feel like they're a threat is subsiding, or it is possible that could lead to a new regional war? >> i will take that question. the m23 is basically a rebel group. how they believe that the terms o
. >> local education decisions are best made at the local level. >> but the ceo of the national rifle association who called the connecticut school murders a "horrible tragedy" is proposing a voluntary program to allow schools to bring in retired police, military or secret service together provide armed security. >> every mom and dad would make them feel better if they drop off their kids at school we have a police officer in the school, good guy that if a horrible monster tries to do something they will be there. >> he says the former republican congressman and homeland security deputy director hutchison will help develop the plan. hutchison compares this on the federal air marshals. >> it's armed guards with a presence there to protect america. should the children less important to protect than the air transportation? i don't think so. >> gun store owners across the country have been reporting skyrocketing gun sales. colorado has unprecedented number of firearm background check applications. the nra says the membership is piking by 8,000 new members a day. >> eric: molly henneberg.
was astonishing. he was driven primarily by this incredible will that he had and thirst for education. he was embarrassed to did not finish college, so he finished law school instead. he went on and on. the idea of senator byrd as majority leader of the senate is quite remarkable. he came into the senate with the great class of 1958. they set the foundation for what i call the great senate that came later, the progressive senate. it was a democratic landslide that year. he was undeniably the most conservative of senators elected. philip hart, a whole -- whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. he opposed thurgood marshall when he was nominated. senator byrd was so conservative on some of these issues that in 1971,richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time.
think of all. though my lack of education has a hurting on, i could read the writing on the wall. kodachrome gave us a nice bright colors command makes you think the world of sunny day. i've got a nikon camera. i love to take photographs. so mama, don't take my kodachrome away. [laughter] >> i'm glad you mentioned it. my essay in the book really tells the back story of the manbo families, by the open with paul simon's kodachrome. i open with that very lyric. because what i say is kodachrome does make you think all the world is a sunny day. but what if the story really isn't so sunny and that's the central problem in the central challenge and the sensual delight of these color photographs. adiabatic adding a mac >> is a very preset of observation. so billy was four when he left camp. he doesn't remember any of this. he had very fleeting memories. his family as was common among japanese american families, his parents never taught about this episode at all within. so he has no memories of this. he has no evidence dearness. he remembers going around looking for rocks with his grandmo
where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. i have a cold, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪
. >> so to a young person today who's pursuing a career in education, they would also need to be trained and comfortedble with the idea of carrying a weapon? >> unfortunately, this is the world we live in. >> by that logic -- one last thing, david. by that logic, why not arm the students as well. >> because the students are children. you don't arm children. >> an 18-year-old? a high school? an 18-year-old high school senior, i mean, by your logic, they, too, should all be carrying weapons. and the lunch ladies and the bus driver? >> no, but the college kids should be armed. absolutely. they have the right to protect themselves. the government cannot protect us. they can't be everywhere all of the time. the government is this delusional thing. >> david, it's such a complicated segment. i hate to play into the sound byte mentality that this week has become. we're 5% of the world's population and we have 50% of the guns. >> i think today, the nra planted a flag on planet bizaro. i hate to use a sound byte like that. but we have more guns in this country and we have more gun violence in this
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has grown. these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for it. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and you have to do battle with th
educators who were taken from us will be laid to rest. we may never know all the reasons why this tragedy happened. we do know that every day since, more americans have died of gun violence. we know such violence has terrible consequences for our society. and if there is even one thing that we can do to prevent any of these events, we have a deep obligation -- all of us -- to try. over these past five days, a discussion has reemerged as to what we might do not only to deter mass shootings in the future, but to reduce the epidemic of gun violence that plagues this country every single day. and it's encouraging that people of all different backgrounds and beliefs and political persuasions have been willing to challenge some old assumptions and change longstanding positions. that conversation has to continue. but this time, the words need to lead to action. we know this is a complex issue that stirs deeply held passions and political divides. and as i said on sunday night, there's no law or set of laws that can prevent every senseless act of violence in our society. we're going to need to wo
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